Daily Image - Jul 2016 Archive - sonofjohan
22 Jul 16.   For those of you on this list who don't know my beginning in photography, my initial foray into this subject was in the area of macro photography. Other than my daughter, only three members on these lists knew me decades before I began these mailings and I met them all during our first tour in the military in Warminister, PA . One, who was my first Division Officer once claimed that I was the only guy he knew that would go to Europe and come back with 500 pictures of GRASS! Another was my wife's best friend who I think spent as much time in our kitchen as she did in hers, and who frequently states whenever I show a true macro "that's a real dave picture." And the third was our minister who also spent a lot of time in our home. He I met in the BOQ bar my first night of that posting. The first is also an avid photographer, the second an accomplished painter, and the third now just apparently enjoys art. My love of the macro world has never abated as you may discern from the fact that one of the regulars mailings is Macro Friday. Over the last several years I have been thinking about returning to the world of macro to a much greater degree, and have been following the work of two photographers in particular, Harold Davis and Kathleen Clemons. Both of their styles offer something I'd like to add to the material I create and for today I'm sharing the first image I've attempted using a technique taught by MS Clemons. Kathleen's work is on the soft side emphasizing color, shape, or both and virtually nothing she creates is in sharp focus. She uses different approaches in her work one of which is camera motion to create a blur that looks a lot like the original but tends to accentuate form over detail. This is something that you likely will either really appreciate or truly dislike. I plan to spend a great deal of time over the next several months/years trying to develop a style somewhere in-between the styles of these two photographers. The shot for today is of a stand of white birches just outside of Mammoth Hot springs. I should have used camera motion to create the blur but since I didn't I created in it software. I then added a texture to get the final look. If you take a close look at the bottom right hand corner, I think you'll have to agree that Sasquatch is indeed alive and well.

The base image was initially given a vertical motion blur, and then a texture was layered on top. Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture priority; ISO 200; 1/160 sec @ f /10.  Hope you enjoy,  dave.

22 Jul 16. For those of you on this list who don't know my beginning in photography, my initial foray into this subject was in the area of macro photography. Other than my daughter, only three members on these lists knew me decades before I began these mailings and I met them all during our first tour in the military in Warminister, PA . One, who was my first Division Officer once claimed that I was the only guy he knew that would go to Europe and come back with 500 pictures of GRASS! Another was my wife's best friend who I think spent as much time in our kitchen as she did in hers, and who frequently states whenever I show a true macro "that's a real dave picture." And the third was our minister who also spent a lot of time in our home. He I met in the BOQ bar my first night of that posting. The first is also an avid photographer, the second an accomplished painter, and the third now just apparently enjoys art. My love of the macro world has never abated as you may discern from the fact that one of the regulars mailings is Macro Friday. Over the last several years I have been thinking about returning to the world of macro to a much greater degree, and have been following the work of two photographers in particular, Harold Davis and Kathleen Clemons. Both of their styles offer something I'd like to add to the material I create and for today I'm sharing the first image I've attempted using a technique taught by MS Clemons. Kathleen's work is on the soft side emphasizing color, shape, or both and virtually nothing she creates is in sharp focus. She uses different approaches in her work one of which is camera motion to create a blur that looks a lot like the original but tends to accentuate form over detail. This is something that you likely will either really appreciate or truly dislike. I plan to spend a great deal of time over the next several months/years trying to develop a style somewhere in-between the styles of these two photographers. The shot for today is of a stand of white birches just outside of Mammoth Hot springs. I should have used camera motion to create the blur but since I didn't I created in it software. I then added a texture to get the final look. If you take a close look at the bottom right hand corner, I think you'll have to agree that Sasquatch is indeed alive and well.

The base image was initially given a vertical motion blur, and then a texture was layered on top. Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture priority; ISO 200; 1/160 sec @ f /10. Hope you enjoy, dave.

mammothbirches04483sasquatchlives