Daily Image - Oct 2013 Archive - sonofjohan
18 Oct 13.  Having been chased, and frequently overrun, by the weather since departing Eglon, we awoke early in the morning in Kalispell, MT to darkness, an almost full moon, and fog, lots of fog. But photography in the fog can be fun, and can also yield some rather interesting images. The foggy weather stayed with us all morning and into the afternoon, eventually dissipating around 1500. During that time it provided us with some beautiful scenery even if not what I had wanted to enjoy while in Glacier National Park. My initial shots, as we entered the park via the west entrance, of the fire damage from a few years back were a complete bust, but shortly thereafter I came upon a small stream, under the fog, that caught my eye as we drove over it. So I stopped the vehicle and walked back to where I could get a couple low level shots realizing as I did that this was a tripod situation without a place to safely work with the tripod, in that I was right at the edge of the road and the tripod would have put me in the road. In retrospect, considering the virtually null traffic at the time, it probably would have been perfectly safe, but I elected to work hand held anyway. The stream itself wasn't anything significant, but the stream bed was/is. Consisting of brightly colored rocks, it almost looks like it is an artificial creation. But what I'm sharing is just the way it looks, and the colors of the rocks are something that are hard to forget. The early morning light has given the image a bit of a blue cast, but I've elected to let it remain as that was the light at the time. A slow shutter speed allowed for the water to go soft, so that is part of the original capture. I've cropped out a fair amount of what was in the original as it added nothing, and I've added a fair amount of micro contrast to provide a greater appreciation of the detail in the rocks. The important thing to note is that I've done no color enhancement; these are the actual colors of the rocks in Snyder Creek. Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 200; 1/10 sec @ f / 8 hand held.

18 Oct 13. Having been chased, and frequently overrun, by the weather since departing Eglon, we awoke early in the morning in Kalispell, MT to darkness, an almost full moon, and fog, lots of fog. But photography in the fog can be fun, and can also yield some rather interesting images. The foggy weather stayed with us all morning and into the afternoon, eventually dissipating around 1500. During that time it provided us with some beautiful scenery even if not what I had wanted to enjoy while in Glacier National Park. My initial shots, as we entered the park via the west entrance, of the fire damage from a few years back were a complete bust, but shortly thereafter I came upon a small stream, under the fog, that caught my eye as we drove over it. So I stopped the vehicle and walked back to where I could get a couple low level shots realizing as I did that this was a tripod situation without a place to safely work with the tripod, in that I was right at the edge of the road and the tripod would have put me in the road. In retrospect, considering the virtually null traffic at the time, it probably would have been perfectly safe, but I elected to work hand held anyway. The stream itself wasn't anything significant, but the stream bed was/is. Consisting of brightly colored rocks, it almost looks like it is an artificial creation. But what I'm sharing is just the way it looks, and the colors of the rocks are something that are hard to forget. The early morning light has given the image a bit of a blue cast, but I've elected to let it remain as that was the light at the time. A slow shutter speed allowed for the water to go soft, so that is part of the original capture. I've cropped out a fair amount of what was in the original as it added nothing, and I've added a fair amount of micro contrast to provide a greater appreciation of the detail in the rocks. The important thing to note is that I've done no color enhancement; these are the actual colors of the rocks in Snyder Creek. Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 200; 1/10 sec @ f / 8 hand held.

glaciernationalpark11114snydercreekearlymorninglight