Daily Image - Oct 2013 Archive - sonofjohan
16 Oct 13.  In considering what I would do for today's fine art image, I began with a search for what is currently considered to be fine art. The short version of what I came up with goes something like "a visual art considered to have been created primarily for aesthetic and intellectual purposes and judged for its beauty and meaningfulness, specifically, painting, sculpture, drawing, watercolor, graphics, and architecture." There was more, as well as a bit of disagreement as to what constitutes fine art, but I rather liked what I've quoted and so will stay with that for the foreseeable future. I wanted to do something with the wildlife we photographed on the trip, and elected to go with another bison image, this time one of the woodland bison as contrasted with the plains bison image I shared previously. I spent almost an hour working to achieve exactly what I wanted, had one version saved, and was preparing to save out the remaining two when my graphics program crashed and over wrote my 10 layers of work with just one! Sometimes it seems the dragon wins and to say the least I'm not very happy with what happened. But I did manage to save one that is perhaps reminiscent of the time of the bison. To get to what I'm sharing, it went like this. Starting with the original image as the background layer, I duped it and then cropped out some unnecessary material and cloned out some other material interfering with the main subject. Then I added a layer of micro contrast enhancement but painted it onto only the areas in which I wanted it. Then I added a layer to which I added some heavy global, meaning on the entire image, contrast adjustment but gave it a 50% reduction to get the look I wanted. Then I added a curves layer to darken just the background but not the subject. To that I added a layer to give a particular color treatment and finally added a layer in which I added a custom vignette. Saved all that out for safe keeping, then added a B&W layer and did some selective noise reduction to that on its own layer. Once again I saved that composite file, and then started to do a creative effect with the subject in color and the background in B&W when the program crashed and overwrote everything with the creative file. But the B&W version had been saved out as two DI files, so I share with you that version. Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 200; 1/100 sec @ f / 6.3.

16 Oct 13. In considering what I would do for today's fine art image, I began with a search for what is currently considered to be fine art. The short version of what I came up with goes something like "a visual art considered to have been created primarily for aesthetic and intellectual purposes and judged for its beauty and meaningfulness, specifically, painting, sculpture, drawing, watercolor, graphics, and architecture." There was more, as well as a bit of disagreement as to what constitutes fine art, but I rather liked what I've quoted and so will stay with that for the foreseeable future. I wanted to do something with the wildlife we photographed on the trip, and elected to go with another bison image, this time one of the woodland bison as contrasted with the plains bison image I shared previously. I spent almost an hour working to achieve exactly what I wanted, had one version saved, and was preparing to save out the remaining two when my graphics program crashed and over wrote my 10 layers of work with just one! Sometimes it seems the dragon wins and to say the least I'm not very happy with what happened. But I did manage to save one that is perhaps reminiscent of the time of the bison. To get to what I'm sharing, it went like this. Starting with the original image as the background layer, I duped it and then cropped out some unnecessary material and cloned out some other material interfering with the main subject. Then I added a layer of micro contrast enhancement but painted it onto only the areas in which I wanted it. Then I added a layer to which I added some heavy global, meaning on the entire image, contrast adjustment but gave it a 50% reduction to get the look I wanted. Then I added a curves layer to darken just the background but not the subject. To that I added a layer to give a particular color treatment and finally added a layer in which I added a custom vignette. Saved all that out for safe keeping, then added a B&W layer and did some selective noise reduction to that on its own layer. Once again I saved that composite file, and then started to do a creative effect with the subject in color and the background in B&W when the program crashed and overwrote everything with the creative file. But the B&W version had been saved out as two DI files, so I share with you that version. Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 200; 1/100 sec @ f / 6.3.

nationalbisonrange10568monochromaticforest