Daily Image - Oct 2013 Archive - sonofjohan
04 Oct 13.  Out first venture out was to the National Bison Range. We traveled east on I-90 to the St Regis exit, then followed the Clark Fork river for a distance driving on MT highways 135 and 200. Our previous visit to the NBR in 2007 netted us lots of bison in a single herd, a nice group of elk, and one pronghorn. This time we found several smaller groups of bison scattered around the park, no elk, but they had been seen and heard bugling earlier that morning, and a group of three pronghorn that posed for us for the better part of 45 minutes. Unlike the previous visit, none of the bison were up close and personal, although most were within easy shooting distance even if the containing fences were frequently a bit disruptive for good photography. We came across several isolated bulls that made for a few good shots, and this is one of them. This guy was a couple hundred yards from a bigger group, and one couldn't help but think he had meandered away for a bit of peace and quiet. While we watched him and another a short distance away, it was hard to determine if he was more interested in lunch or partaking of the wallow beside him. The light was constantly changing while we were driving through the park on the roughly 19 miles that take you around the entire area. What started out as mostly blue skies with white clouds continuously progressed to more and more clouds with less blue sky and plenty of gray, eventually culminating in lots of rain, but not until minutes after we got back to our motel. The shot of this magnificent creature was taken while we still had mostly blue skies, but it turned out a bit more "bland" than I would have desired. so, starting with the original shot as a background layer, I added a curves contrast enhancement to darken the entire thing. Combining those two layers, I added some small detail enhancement to the bison, then ran another curves correction to background. I then added the vignette, added another curves layer this time just to ever so slightly lighten the bison, and then flattened the entire thing and set it to the sRGB gamut for the web and computer viewing. I also made three other versions of the shot, all different, and I think they would all make for good viewing.  Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 200; 1/160 sec @ f / 8.

04 Oct 13. Out first venture out was to the National Bison Range. We traveled east on I-90 to the St Regis exit, then followed the Clark Fork river for a distance driving on MT highways 135 and 200. Our previous visit to the NBR in 2007 netted us lots of bison in a single herd, a nice group of elk, and one pronghorn. This time we found several smaller groups of bison scattered around the park, no elk, but they had been seen and heard bugling earlier that morning, and a group of three pronghorn that posed for us for the better part of 45 minutes. Unlike the previous visit, none of the bison were up close and personal, although most were within easy shooting distance even if the containing fences were frequently a bit disruptive for good photography. We came across several isolated bulls that made for a few good shots, and this is one of them. This guy was a couple hundred yards from a bigger group, and one couldn't help but think he had meandered away for a bit of peace and quiet. While we watched him and another a short distance away, it was hard to determine if he was more interested in lunch or partaking of the wallow beside him. The light was constantly changing while we were driving through the park on the roughly 19 miles that take you around the entire area. What started out as mostly blue skies with white clouds continuously progressed to more and more clouds with less blue sky and plenty of gray, eventually culminating in lots of rain, but not until minutes after we got back to our motel. The shot of this magnificent creature was taken while we still had mostly blue skies, but it turned out a bit more "bland" than I would have desired. so, starting with the original shot as a background layer, I added a curves contrast enhancement to darken the entire thing. Combining those two layers, I added some small detail enhancement to the bison, then ran another curves correction to background. I then added the vignette, added another curves layer this time just to ever so slightly lighten the bison, and then flattened the entire thing and set it to the sRGB gamut for the web and computer viewing. I also made three other versions of the shot, all different, and I think they would all make for good viewing. Nikon D300s; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 200; 1/160 sec @ f / 8.

nationalbisonrange10525vignettedbull