Daily Image - Jul 2012 Archive - sonofjohan
23 Jul 12. This past week, ending with ceremonies on Sunday, was the annual "Paddle", or Tribal Journey, in which the "local," meaning from the mid WA Pacific coast to British Columbia, Tribal Nations paddled their canoes - or longboats - from their national lands to a designated meeting point for ceremonial activities, this year being Suquamish, (note the original Indian spelling) WA, literally just down the road from us a few miles. I have the cherubs for a few days so my cousin's wife and I took them to observe the ceremonies being held on Saturday evening. We were fortunate in getting a parking spot a half block from the activities which made the whole thing a lot more enjoyable, and good seating in the Ceremonial Lodge. Most of the tribes were pretty tired from 6 days of pulling, so unfortunately we didn't get to see a large amount ceremonial activities, but we did get to listen to about an hour of song and drums, which was very enjoyable, plus the dances from three of the Nations. That was about all the cherubs could handle, so at that point we left the Ceremonial Lodge for other activities. Outside the Lodge there were all the canoes parked in parallel rows offering all the visitors a chance to see them up close so we took some tie to observe them while the cherubs played on the lawn. Earlier in the day I had driven to Point-No-Point to see them as they both stopped for a rest along the way and paddled past. A few of the canoes were beached and offered a opportunity to shoot them near the water. I've enhanced the structure of the canoe in this image to give you a much better idea of the work that goes into carving one from a singe log, although not all of them were carved from a single log, and a couple were even totally fiberglass. The fiberglass canoes are of course not the real McCoy, but are of the exact same dimensions and design. Nikon D300s; Aperture Priority; 18-200;  ISO 200; 1/800 sec @ f / 7.1.

23 Jul 12. This past week, ending with ceremonies on Sunday, was the annual "Paddle", or Tribal Journey, in which the "local," meaning from the mid WA Pacific coast to British Columbia, Tribal Nations paddled their canoes - or longboats - from their national lands to a designated meeting point for ceremonial activities, this year being Suquamish, (note the original Indian spelling) WA, literally just down the road from us a few miles. I have the cherubs for a few days so my cousin's wife and I took them to observe the ceremonies being held on Saturday evening. We were fortunate in getting a parking spot a half block from the activities which made the whole thing a lot more enjoyable, and good seating in the Ceremonial Lodge. Most of the tribes were pretty tired from 6 days of pulling, so unfortunately we didn't get to see a large amount ceremonial activities, but we did get to listen to about an hour of song and drums, which was very enjoyable, plus the dances from three of the Nations. That was about all the cherubs could handle, so at that point we left the Ceremonial Lodge for other activities. Outside the Lodge there were all the canoes parked in parallel rows offering all the visitors a chance to see them up close so we took some tie to observe them while the cherubs played on the lawn. Earlier in the day I had driven to Point-No-Point to see them as they both stopped for a rest along the way and paddled past. A few of the canoes were beached and offered a opportunity to shoot them near the water. I've enhanced the structure of the canoe in this image to give you a much better idea of the work that goes into carving one from a singe log, although not all of them were carved from a single log, and a couple were even totally fiberglass. The fiberglass canoes are of course not the real McCoy, but are of the exact same dimensions and design. Nikon D300s; Aperture Priority; 18-200; ISO 200; 1/800 sec @ f / 7.1.

paddlesuquamish201213088beachedlongboat