Daily Image - Jul 2012 Archive - sonofjohan
25 Jul 12.  A majority of the big name graphics manipulation software companies are now providing a tool for bringing out the fine detail in objects that possess it but which is generally lost in "normal" photography. The tool goes by various names such as "structure", "presence", or "clarity" to give just three examples, and works by increasing the contrast of the smallest detail in the object. Used properly, it can make a striking difference in what can be seen in the subject being photographed. Used to an extreme and you have the "grunge" look that characterized the HDR approach in its early years and which resulted in the HDR approach to photography getting a bad name. I've employed the technique in several of the last images, hopefully in a manner that made for realistic looking images. To illustrate, I've divided the image for today, a close up of the shellfish feast, into halves, with the left half being what the camera delivered and the right half having the technique applied. You may or may not like the results, but to give the technique its due, cover the image such that you can view only one half at a time. Switch between the two halves letting your eye rest on each half for 15 seconds or so before switching; then decide. Nikon D300s; Aperture Priority; 18 - 200; ISO 200; 1/100 sec @ f / 5.6.

25 Jul 12. A majority of the big name graphics manipulation software companies are now providing a tool for bringing out the fine detail in objects that possess it but which is generally lost in "normal" photography. The tool goes by various names such as "structure", "presence", or "clarity" to give just three examples, and works by increasing the contrast of the smallest detail in the object. Used properly, it can make a striking difference in what can be seen in the subject being photographed. Used to an extreme and you have the "grunge" look that characterized the HDR approach in its early years and which resulted in the HDR approach to photography getting a bad name. I've employed the technique in several of the last images, hopefully in a manner that made for realistic looking images. To illustrate, I've divided the image for today, a close up of the shellfish feast, into halves, with the left half being what the camera delivered and the right half having the technique applied. You may or may not like the results, but to give the technique its due, cover the image such that you can view only one half at a time. Switch between the two halves letting your eye rest on each half for 15 seconds or so before switching; then decide. Nikon D300s; Aperture Priority; 18 - 200; ISO 200; 1/100 sec @ f / 5.6.

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