Daily Image - May 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
06 May 11.  As you may all recall from the days spent in math class, the approach of choice is calculating the area of a non-static (curving) surface is The Calculus for which we have many folks to thank but more generally we tend to think, inappropriately, just of Newton. The idea of course is that if we take an infinite number of finite slices we can think of each slice as being a perfect rectangle and thus get around the error associated with converting a curved surface into a flat one. In fact, with the slices sufficiently thin the error is virtually nil.  Now the problem of calculating the area of a curving surface is akin to the problem of getting all of a picture totally sharp, something referred to as depth of field and abbreviated as DOF. In reality, there is only a vary narrow band across any image that is actually totally in focus. Generally it is such that the human eye can't fully discern how very tiny it is, and a much larger area is seen as being sharp. Still, that area seen as sharp is always a challenge to achieve, and very much so in close up work. So the challenge is to get the image as sharp of possible, circumstances allowing. Enter Heliconsoft, a company (one of several actually) which has written a piece of software that basically applies the concept of The Calculus to photography. The idea is to take a large number of shots of the same image but shifting the plane of focus incrementally from front to back as they are being taken. The group of images is then combined by the software in such a manner that it takes just the band that's crisp from each frame and stacks these pieces together to form a single image that is very sharp front to back. The image for today attempts to illustrate it using a group of 7 images taken at an aperture of just f/8. The camera is about 2 feet in front of the circular garden display and the spent daffodil fields (dull yellow band roughly in the middle of the image) about 100 years distant. All is pretty much in focus due to this process of combining the slices. The same technique was used for the image shared yesterday. A "small" drawback in this kind of photography is the need for total stillness in the air, and that was far from the case when these images were shot. Still, the software does a rather amazing job of dealing not only with the focus issue, but also the movement of the subject, in addition to the problem associate with apparent size changes from the shifting focal point. This was not the strongest shot of the day, but it does serve well to illustrate the point. The approach has some great potential which I hope to exploit in future work.  ISO 200; 1/640 @ f / 8.

06 May 11. As you may all recall from the days spent in math class, the approach of choice is calculating the area of a non-static (curving) surface is The Calculus for which we have many folks to thank but more generally we tend to think, inappropriately, just of Newton. The idea of course is that if we take an infinite number of finite slices we can think of each slice as being a perfect rectangle and thus get around the error associated with converting a curved surface into a flat one. In fact, with the slices sufficiently thin the error is virtually nil. Now the problem of calculating the area of a curving surface is akin to the problem of getting all of a picture totally sharp, something referred to as depth of field and abbreviated as DOF. In reality, there is only a vary narrow band across any image that is actually totally in focus. Generally it is such that the human eye can't fully discern how very tiny it is, and a much larger area is seen as being sharp. Still, that area seen as sharp is always a challenge to achieve, and very much so in close up work. So the challenge is to get the image as sharp of possible, circumstances allowing. Enter Heliconsoft, a company (one of several actually) which has written a piece of software that basically applies the concept of The Calculus to photography. The idea is to take a large number of shots of the same image but shifting the plane of focus incrementally from front to back as they are being taken. The group of images is then combined by the software in such a manner that it takes just the band that's crisp from each frame and stacks these pieces together to form a single image that is very sharp front to back. The image for today attempts to illustrate it using a group of 7 images taken at an aperture of just f/8. The camera is about 2 feet in front of the circular garden display and the spent daffodil fields (dull yellow band roughly in the middle of the image) about 100 years distant. All is pretty much in focus due to this process of combining the slices. The same technique was used for the image shared yesterday. A "small" drawback in this kind of photography is the need for total stillness in the air, and that was far from the case when these images were shot. Still, the software does a rather amazing job of dealing not only with the focus issue, but also the movement of the subject, in addition to the problem associate with apparent size changes from the shifting focal point. This was not the strongest shot of the day, but it does serve well to illustrate the point. The approach has some great potential which I hope to exploit in future work. ISO 200; 1/640 @ f / 8.

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