Daily Image - Mar 2012 Archive - sonofjohan
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14 Mar 12.  Our last tour in the Navy was spent in MD and we lived in a community known as Montgomery Village, about which I could write much. For today I will discuss a bit of the wildlife that was there on a daily basis, year round. We basically lived across the street from a lovely little lake (Whetstone) that the County was trying to usurp as a catch basin for multiple family developments upstream of us. That is a story all unto itself, but in spite of the County, the lake was home to many animals including a huge number of carp, lots of turtles including two gigantic Snapping Turtles, LOTS of miscellaneous birds, aquatic and song, about 400 Canada Geese and a heronery that was home to roughly 20 nesting pairs each Spring/Summer and about 3 pair that remained all year. Most everything about the lake based wildlife was enjoyable, save for some aspects of the flock of Canada Geese. We lived directly under the final leg of the flight path to the lake, and every night we would have them flying directly over our house and low enough that you could hit them with a rock should you so desire. The also liked to inhabit a small green space between us and the lake, often times forgetting that there was a difference between the grass covering the green space and that comprising our front lawn. If you've never experienced a thorough fertilizing of your lawn, that is, what's left of it, by a group of adult Canada Geese, you are in for a "memorable" experience, and that memory being one you won't forget no matter how hard you try. Running them off can be a bit of a crap shoot as generally they grudgingly move on, except for those times when they decide to stay put and defend "their" territory. They are bigger than you think, and they are much stronger than you might imagine a bird would be. While working on edging the side of the yard one afternoon I actually had one misjudge the required space for a successful launch and it flew into me knocking me over with it flapping wing! I have a lot of respect for the power of these animals. But not much, if any, respect for how they "co-existed" with us and our property. We had to deal with perhaps 10 birds max at a time; imagine how the folks up in Fir Island, where I get all the geese images, must feel about having a flock of Snow Geese approaching 10,000 in number hang out in their "front" yards.  ISO 400; 1/1000 sec @ f / 8.

14 Mar 12. Our last tour in the Navy was spent in MD and we lived in a community known as Montgomery Village, about which I could write much. For today I will discuss a bit of the wildlife that was there on a daily basis, year round. We basically lived across the street from a lovely little lake (Whetstone) that the County was trying to usurp as a catch basin for multiple family developments upstream of us. That is a story all unto itself, but in spite of the County, the lake was home to many animals including a huge number of carp, lots of turtles including two gigantic Snapping Turtles, LOTS of miscellaneous birds, aquatic and song, about 400 Canada Geese and a heronery that was home to roughly 20 nesting pairs each Spring/Summer and about 3 pair that remained all year. Most everything about the lake based wildlife was enjoyable, save for some aspects of the flock of Canada Geese. We lived directly under the final leg of the flight path to the lake, and every night we would have them flying directly over our house and low enough that you could hit them with a rock should you so desire. The also liked to inhabit a small green space between us and the lake, often times forgetting that there was a difference between the grass covering the green space and that comprising our front lawn. If you've never experienced a thorough fertilizing of your lawn, that is, what's left of it, by a group of adult Canada Geese, you are in for a "memorable" experience, and that memory being one you won't forget no matter how hard you try. Running them off can be a bit of a crap shoot as generally they grudgingly move on, except for those times when they decide to stay put and defend "their" territory. They are bigger than you think, and they are much stronger than you might imagine a bird would be. While working on edging the side of the yard one afternoon I actually had one misjudge the required space for a successful launch and it flew into me knocking me over with it flapping wing! I have a lot of respect for the power of these animals. But not much, if any, respect for how they "co-existed" with us and our property. We had to deal with perhaps 10 birds max at a time; imagine how the folks up in Fir Island, where I get all the geese images, must feel about having a flock of Snow Geese approaching 10,000 in number hang out in their "front" yards. ISO 400; 1/1000 sec @ f / 8.

firislandsnowgeese05412yardfertilizers