Daily Image - Mar 2012 Archive - sonofjohan
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09 Mar 12.  While stationed at the Naval Air Development Center in Warminster, PA during our first tour of duty in the military, we attended many social events sponsored initially by the Wives Club and then later on by both the Wives Club and the Officer's Association, an entity that was formed for the first time, at that base, during that tour. There were many memorable events, some far more so than others, some of which I won't write about, and some that were very entertaining centering around artistic endeavors. Of these the most memorable were the annual art auctions, and a time in our lives during which we acquired a number of very nice pieces of art, mostly oil paintings, but some water color, and one acrylic. The acrylic was perhaps the most interesting of all the pieces we acquired, and was of a scene in Old Williamsburg depicting a rural street with several period homes, an area we have visited many times! Now what made the acrylic so interesting was the application of color and how it displayed on that particular medium. It so significantly differed from any other combination of pigment and substrate that I have often found myself looking at it and wondering how I might employ something equally unique in my photography, but not in a form that would be considered emulation. The result of such contemplation has been the employment of a technique that some might term solarization, although it is not of that style, even though the means of achieving the result are similar. In the process of  playing around with the application of  various contrast levels, I decide to try working in the extreme and concluded that by totally inverting the curve that one is presented with initially when working with a curves layer, that I could achieve a look very close to that of using acrylic as the base for the application of pigment, but a look that is, at the same time, very different. This is how the end result looks. ISO 320; 1/80 sec @ f / 9.

09 Mar 12. While stationed at the Naval Air Development Center in Warminster, PA during our first tour of duty in the military, we attended many social events sponsored initially by the Wives Club and then later on by both the Wives Club and the Officer's Association, an entity that was formed for the first time, at that base, during that tour. There were many memorable events, some far more so than others, some of which I won't write about, and some that were very entertaining centering around artistic endeavors. Of these the most memorable were the annual art auctions, and a time in our lives during which we acquired a number of very nice pieces of art, mostly oil paintings, but some water color, and one acrylic. The acrylic was perhaps the most interesting of all the pieces we acquired, and was of a scene in Old Williamsburg depicting a rural street with several period homes, an area we have visited many times! Now what made the acrylic so interesting was the application of color and how it displayed on that particular medium. It so significantly differed from any other combination of pigment and substrate that I have often found myself looking at it and wondering how I might employ something equally unique in my photography, but not in a form that would be considered emulation. The result of such contemplation has been the employment of a technique that some might term solarization, although it is not of that style, even though the means of achieving the result are similar. In the process of playing around with the application of various contrast levels, I decide to try working in the extreme and concluded that by totally inverting the curve that one is presented with initially when working with a curves layer, that I could achieve a look very close to that of using acrylic as the base for the application of pigment, but a look that is, at the same time, very different. This is how the end result looks. ISO 320; 1/80 sec @ f / 9.

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