Daily Image - Feb 2012 Archive - sonofjohan
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14 Feb 12.  During our first tour in the Navy, while stationed at the Naval Air Development Center in Warminister, PA, in Beautiful Bucks County, which is how it is termed and it is rightly so named, we used to travel up into the Pocono Mountains, considered one of the most romantic places in the U.S. An appropriate place to visit for Valentine's Day as well as for those June nuptials. On the way, traveling along Route 611, you pass through an area known as Ringing Rock, and there is a state park there by the name of Ringing Rocks. Contained in the park is an approx 7.5 acre field of boulders, which, if struck with something solid, produce a musical tone. It was great fun to walk out amongst the rocks with the kids and strike them with a hammer and listen to them "sing."  When we returned to the area for our fourth tour the rocks had been placed off limits and one was no longer allowed to enjoy the wonderful sounds produced by striking them. It may be that you are now again allowed to "play" them, and if so, I would encourage all of you, should the opportunity present itself, to so do. If that's not in your travel plans, you might elect to visit Puerto Vallarta where you can walk along the shoreline adjacent to the Malecon and listen to the crashing waves play percussion with the rocks on the beach. In this particular area the rocks, ranging in size from a child's clenched fist to large boulders, lie somewhat loosely stacked on the sand. As the onrushing waves crash on the beach, the inflowing water tends to push them up into a tighter configuration. As the water recedes, much slower than it arrived, the rocks try to reposition themselves creating a very pleasant rattling sound. We stopped and listened for several minutes before becoming sufficiently accustomed to it and moved on down the waterfront. Apparently this unusual performance wasn't considered of sufficient interest as it was not listed on any of the tourist attractions.   ISO 200; 1/1000 sec @ f / 8.

14 Feb 12. During our first tour in the Navy, while stationed at the Naval Air Development Center in Warminister, PA, in Beautiful Bucks County, which is how it is termed and it is rightly so named, we used to travel up into the Pocono Mountains, considered one of the most romantic places in the U.S. An appropriate place to visit for Valentine's Day as well as for those June nuptials. On the way, traveling along Route 611, you pass through an area known as Ringing Rock, and there is a state park there by the name of Ringing Rocks. Contained in the park is an approx 7.5 acre field of boulders, which, if struck with something solid, produce a musical tone. It was great fun to walk out amongst the rocks with the kids and strike them with a hammer and listen to them "sing." When we returned to the area for our fourth tour the rocks had been placed off limits and one was no longer allowed to enjoy the wonderful sounds produced by striking them. It may be that you are now again allowed to "play" them, and if so, I would encourage all of you, should the opportunity present itself, to so do. If that's not in your travel plans, you might elect to visit Puerto Vallarta where you can walk along the shoreline adjacent to the Malecon and listen to the crashing waves play percussion with the rocks on the beach. In this particular area the rocks, ranging in size from a child's clenched fist to large boulders, lie somewhat loosely stacked on the sand. As the onrushing waves crash on the beach, the inflowing water tends to push them up into a tighter configuration. As the water recedes, much slower than it arrived, the rocks try to reposition themselves creating a very pleasant rattling sound. We stopped and listened for several minutes before becoming sufficiently accustomed to it and moved on down the waterfront. Apparently this unusual performance wasn't considered of sufficient interest as it was not listed on any of the tourist attractions. ISO 200; 1/1000 sec @ f / 8.

puertovallarta00636musicalrocks