Daily Image - Apr 2012 Archive - sonofjohan
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19 Apr 12.  Traveling along Canada's Yellowhead Highway in 1973, on my way to Edmonton, I passed by one of the most beautiful mountains I had seen anywhere, but was unaware of what I was seeing. When I arrived in Edmonton I was asked if I had seen Mt Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies. I mumbled something about I didn't know if I had or not, but that I had passed by this beautiful peak along the way. Pressed for a more definitive response, it was determined that I had indeed passed by Mt Robson and, more importantly, gotten a very rare opportunity to actually see it. Further discussion revealed that the mountain is seldom visible and that to see it is comparable to a gift. The folks with whom I was staying had never seen it their entire lives and thought it a good omen that I had. Perhaps so, because my interviews there went very well. Jan flew up a few days later to join me, and we then drove back to Seattle together, passing by the park to see if the mountain might once again be visible, something my friends thought would be akin to winning the lottery, only there weren't any lotteries back then. To bad too, because, lo and behold, the mountain was once again out in all her splendor. We spent a couple hours there seeing the sights to include a sign about not feeding, teasing, encouraging, or anything else with the bears to include leaving exposed food in your vehicle. Apparently the owner(s) of a rather nice convertible didn't fully comprehend what that sign really meant and left some exposed food in their vehicle. Well now, would you believe, a hungry bear (read that as all bears) just happened by and, finding a container with an easy opening lid, took advantage of the situation and, with one swipe of its paw "removed" the soft top, climbed in, and had a self serve lunch. Perhaps I should rewrite that sentence describing the vehicle to say a previously nice convertible as it wasn't by the time we saw it. Should have taken a photo of that but didn't, instead concentrating on the block of granite that few people supposedly ever see. It was a good visit and an even better drive as the Yellowhead Highway has to be one of the most beautiful drives anywhere in the world. No stats on the shot for today as it was taken almost 40 years ago with my F2AS and 55mm macro lens on Fujichrome 100 slide film and which I have just recently scanned.

19 Apr 12. Traveling along Canada's Yellowhead Highway in 1973, on my way to Edmonton, I passed by one of the most beautiful mountains I had seen anywhere, but was unaware of what I was seeing. When I arrived in Edmonton I was asked if I had seen Mt Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies. I mumbled something about I didn't know if I had or not, but that I had passed by this beautiful peak along the way. Pressed for a more definitive response, it was determined that I had indeed passed by Mt Robson and, more importantly, gotten a very rare opportunity to actually see it. Further discussion revealed that the mountain is seldom visible and that to see it is comparable to a gift. The folks with whom I was staying had never seen it their entire lives and thought it a good omen that I had. Perhaps so, because my interviews there went very well. Jan flew up a few days later to join me, and we then drove back to Seattle together, passing by the park to see if the mountain might once again be visible, something my friends thought would be akin to winning the lottery, only there weren't any lotteries back then. To bad too, because, lo and behold, the mountain was once again out in all her splendor. We spent a couple hours there seeing the sights to include a sign about not feeding, teasing, encouraging, or anything else with the bears to include leaving exposed food in your vehicle. Apparently the owner(s) of a rather nice convertible didn't fully comprehend what that sign really meant and left some exposed food in their vehicle. Well now, would you believe, a hungry bear (read that as all bears) just happened by and, finding a container with an easy opening lid, took advantage of the situation and, with one swipe of its paw "removed" the soft top, climbed in, and had a self serve lunch. Perhaps I should rewrite that sentence describing the vehicle to say a previously nice convertible as it wasn't by the time we saw it. Should have taken a photo of that but didn't, instead concentrating on the block of granite that few people supposedly ever see. It was a good visit and an even better drive as the Yellowhead Highway has to be one of the most beautiful drives anywhere in the world. No stats on the shot for today as it was taken almost 40 years ago with my F2AS and 55mm macro lens on Fujichrome 100 slide film and which I have just recently scanned.

robsonyellowheadhywy