Daily Image - Nov 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
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29 Nov 11.  Just back from our annual pilgrimage to listen to the Seattle Pacific University's presentation of The Sacred Sounds of Christmas. This is our 6th time and it seems like every year it is simultaneously old and new, but very refreshing and most enjoyable. Their arrangement of O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, also the processional, was the most beautiful and moving version of it I have ever heard!! If they didn't record it (I'm betting they didn't) to CD or DVD, they definitely should have. It needs to be saved for posterity. Much like we do with our digital images. Which brings me to the topic for today's image, an image unlike any I've ever shared. While I worked in the camera store I had this "conversation" with many a customer but few, I'm rather certain, actually believed me. So I pose to you the same question: which side of the disc is the sensitive (needs to be protected from scratches, etc) side. I'm wagering most of you will say the underside, the silver side. If you do, you will be in error. It is the top side that must be protected. You can scratch, scrape, do just about anything you want to that underside, and inflict no damage. The disc is just a clear piece of plastic designed to give the recording material bulk , or structure, if you prefer. Look at the image; it has four parts to it labeled Fig 1 - 4. Fig 1 is a disc with a sticky note attached; observe that it appears to be a little wrinkled near the edge of the sticky note. Fig 2 is that same disc after I removed the sticky note which pulled off the recording layer from the top of the disc. Observe that you can see clear through the disc, where the shiny stuff used to be, to the table cloth underneath. Figs 3 & 4 are the underside of that same disc. In figure 3, you can see that I've placed the part that pulled off ,above and to the left to show it clearly to you (note the same shape and size of the material attached to the sticky note and the clear area on the disc. Fig 4 is the same thing with the sticky note and recording material removed. Again, observe that you can see clear through the transparent plastic disc. So now you have visible proof as to which side is the critical side and the one that needs protection, not only from scratches, but from acids, like that found in Sharpe marking pens, that will quickly etch through that thin layer of recording material. It is the top side! Solution, ALWAYS put a paper label on the discs you are using to store your archived images and label with printer ink or an archival pen which you can get t any scrap booking or stationery store. Hope you enjoy,   dave


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29 Nov 11. Just back from our annual pilgrimage to listen to the Seattle Pacific University's presentation of The Sacred Sounds of Christmas. This is our 6th time and it seems like every year it is simultaneously old and new, but very refreshing and most enjoyable. Their arrangement of O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, also the processional, was the most beautiful and moving version of it I have ever heard!! If they didn't record it (I'm betting they didn't) to CD or DVD, they definitely should have. It needs to be saved for posterity. Much like we do with our digital images. Which brings me to the topic for today's image, an image unlike any I've ever shared. While I worked in the camera store I had this "conversation" with many a customer but few, I'm rather certain, actually believed me. So I pose to you the same question: which side of the disc is the sensitive (needs to be protected from scratches, etc) side. I'm wagering most of you will say the underside, the silver side. If you do, you will be in error. It is the top side that must be protected. You can scratch, scrape, do just about anything you want to that underside, and inflict no damage. The disc is just a clear piece of plastic designed to give the recording material bulk , or structure, if you prefer. Look at the image; it has four parts to it labeled Fig 1 - 4. Fig 1 is a disc with a sticky note attached; observe that it appears to be a little wrinkled near the edge of the sticky note. Fig 2 is that same disc after I removed the sticky note which pulled off the recording layer from the top of the disc. Observe that you can see clear through the disc, where the shiny stuff used to be, to the table cloth underneath. Figs 3 & 4 are the underside of that same disc. In figure 3, you can see that I've placed the part that pulled off ,above and to the left to show it clearly to you (note the same shape and size of the material attached to the sticky note and the clear area on the disc. Fig 4 is the same thing with the sticky note and recording material removed. Again, observe that you can see clear through the transparent plastic disc. So now you have visible proof as to which side is the critical side and the one that needs protection, not only from scratches, but from acids, like that found in Sharpe marking pens, that will quickly etch through that thin layer of recording material. It is the top side! Solution, ALWAYS put a paper label on the discs you are using to store your archived images and label with printer ink or an archival pen which you can get t any scrap booking or stationery store. Hope you enjoy, dave


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