Daily Image - Nov 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
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01 Nov 11.  Picking back up where we left off on Friday. As I write about HDR imaging I must admit that I'm finding it a bit amusing that just about every one in our area who provides some form of photo tours is now an expert on HDR imaging, and everyone of them has this or that seminar ongoing for a substantial fee, which includes the speakers at this year's annual NWCCC meeting. In the last three years I've listened to perhaps a dozen "experts" and they all have provided some serious misinformation in their lectures every time they get into the technical aspects (read math) of the subject. It would be funny if it were not so sad, and a lot better if they stayed in the area they actually know. That said, let's get back to the discussion of HDR and its uses. As I've mentioned before, the HDR approach can be employed to run the gamut of images that range from the "grunge" look (cartoon-ish) to the absolute natural looking, and just about everything in between. I've provided examples of all these types over the past three years and several of them, although not identified as such, have taken awards in various venues. There is a place for all the approaches to the HDR "look" and all are equally appropriate when employed in the right context. Now one generally thinks of an HDR image as being rather flat, for indeed, compression of the extremes in the lighting (shadows & highlights) is how the software is employed to deal with images having large dynamic ranges (extremes on both ends in the same composition). But the technique need not be constrained to that type of "look." For the rest of the week we'll deal with four different HDR images and discuss what has been done to achieve the particular look and hopefully, in the process, look at a 50+ composite HDR image. For today we will look at an image that looks like just like any other single image properly exposed, i.e., natural looking. This image was taken on an overcast day but with a sufficiently large dynamic range none the less. It was made from 5 original images, -2, -1. 0, +1, +2 using HDR software to get the base image, them "adjusted" to give it more contrast to reach the natural look. I then changed the white balance to remove the blue light and return the water to looking white, something I think we would consider more normal than a light blue waterfall. A slow shutter was employed to get the cottony look in the flowing stream. ISO 200; 1/8 sec (middle of 5) @ f / 9.

01 Nov 11. Picking back up where we left off on Friday. As I write about HDR imaging I must admit that I'm finding it a bit amusing that just about every one in our area who provides some form of photo tours is now an expert on HDR imaging, and everyone of them has this or that seminar ongoing for a substantial fee, which includes the speakers at this year's annual NWCCC meeting. In the last three years I've listened to perhaps a dozen "experts" and they all have provided some serious misinformation in their lectures every time they get into the technical aspects (read math) of the subject. It would be funny if it were not so sad, and a lot better if they stayed in the area they actually know. That said, let's get back to the discussion of HDR and its uses. As I've mentioned before, the HDR approach can be employed to run the gamut of images that range from the "grunge" look (cartoon-ish) to the absolute natural looking, and just about everything in between. I've provided examples of all these types over the past three years and several of them, although not identified as such, have taken awards in various venues. There is a place for all the approaches to the HDR "look" and all are equally appropriate when employed in the right context. Now one generally thinks of an HDR image as being rather flat, for indeed, compression of the extremes in the lighting (shadows & highlights) is how the software is employed to deal with images having large dynamic ranges (extremes on both ends in the same composition). But the technique need not be constrained to that type of "look." For the rest of the week we'll deal with four different HDR images and discuss what has been done to achieve the particular look and hopefully, in the process, look at a 50+ composite HDR image. For today we will look at an image that looks like just like any other single image properly exposed, i.e., natural looking. This image was taken on an overcast day but with a sufficiently large dynamic range none the less. It was made from 5 original images, -2, -1. 0, +1, +2 using HDR software to get the base image, them "adjusted" to give it more contrast to reach the natural look. I then changed the white balance to remove the blue light and return the water to looking white, something I think we would consider more normal than a light blue waterfall. A slow shutter was employed to get the cottony look in the flowing stream. ISO 200; 1/8 sec (middle of 5) @ f / 9.

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