Daily Image - Nov 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
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30 Nov 11.  I started reading Jean Auel's Earth Children series 30 years ago, back in the summer of 1981 when the paperback version of The Clan of the Cave Bear was released as a Bantam book. I've been following the entire series ever since and am now well into the concluding volume entitled "The Land of the Painted Caves". Her writing is captivating for the descriptions she provides about supposed life in what I would imagine to have been the Pleistocene Period. Although she takes extreme liberties in her description of human interactions, sometimes to the ridiculous, it is her tale of how people lived off the land that captures and holds my attention. Some of what she writes, as with other authors I've read, seemed totally unrealistic, until I spent the time in Antarctica. After experiencing some of the things I had read about first hand during exposure training, it all began to make better sense. Now I find much of what she writes to be substantially more plausible, at least that pertaining to the human /environmental interactions. As I read any of these books, an even better series being the North America's Forgotten Past by Gear & Gear, a husband and wife team of archaeologists, I find myself wondering who was the first to ever _____ and how did they come upon the idea originally. When you think about some of the things are ancestors have done, it is hard to fathom how anyone initially came upon the ideas. While walking around the neighborhood a couple days past and taking shots of leaves that had made their way to the ground, I noticed this scene in which it looks like the grasses have begun to weave themselves into something. Looking at this pattern I could envision someone a bit smarter than me for sure, seeing the association, and trying to weave something for the first time. Which leads me to think that some of the "stories" in the books may not be all that far off. ISO 200; 1/320 sec @ f / 6.3.

30 Nov 11. I started reading Jean Auel's Earth Children series 30 years ago, back in the summer of 1981 when the paperback version of The Clan of the Cave Bear was released as a Bantam book. I've been following the entire series ever since and am now well into the concluding volume entitled "The Land of the Painted Caves". Her writing is captivating for the descriptions she provides about supposed life in what I would imagine to have been the Pleistocene Period. Although she takes extreme liberties in her description of human interactions, sometimes to the ridiculous, it is her tale of how people lived off the land that captures and holds my attention. Some of what she writes, as with other authors I've read, seemed totally unrealistic, until I spent the time in Antarctica. After experiencing some of the things I had read about first hand during exposure training, it all began to make better sense. Now I find much of what she writes to be substantially more plausible, at least that pertaining to the human /environmental interactions. As I read any of these books, an even better series being the North America's Forgotten Past by Gear & Gear, a husband and wife team of archaeologists, I find myself wondering who was the first to ever _____ and how did they come upon the idea originally. When you think about some of the things are ancestors have done, it is hard to fathom how anyone initially came upon the ideas. While walking around the neighborhood a couple days past and taking shots of leaves that had made their way to the ground, I noticed this scene in which it looks like the grasses have begun to weave themselves into something. Looking at this pattern I could envision someone a bit smarter than me for sure, seeing the association, and trying to weave something for the first time. Which leads me to think that some of the "stories" in the books may not be all that far off. ISO 200; 1/320 sec @ f / 6.3.

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