Daily Image - Oct 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
Powered by SmugMug Log In
19 Oct 11. Animals without internal skeletons often have their armor on the outside, and it is commonly referred to as an exoskeleton. An animal of this type with which we are all familiar might be a crab. Whenever a crab outgrows its exoskeleton, it "molts" meaning that it climbs out of its current shell and forms a new, bigger one more appropriate the the individual's greater girth. When crabs do this and are caught in the process of hardening the new shell, they are referred to as soft shelled crabs. This replacement of a body part is found in many critters, and in reptiles we call it shedding. Something my python does regularly but for the last several years he has done it poorly and we now ever get a fully intact skin. Likewise I have seldom found what might be called a fully intact exoskeleton of a crab, that is, until this summer when I came upon one during the June low tides that was very close to being fully intact. So I took several shots of it and while I liked at least one which I prepared for this list, it really wasn't good enough as it was, so I decided to run it through a filter to see if I could improve on it. What resulted is in my opinion much more interesting than the original, albeit very abstract. See if you agree; the head is facing towards the left, and all the legs are visible although you may have to study it a while to locate them. ISO 200; 1/160 sec @ f / 9.

19 Oct 11. Animals without internal skeletons often have their armor on the outside, and it is commonly referred to as an exoskeleton. An animal of this type with which we are all familiar might be a crab. Whenever a crab outgrows its exoskeleton, it "molts" meaning that it climbs out of its current shell and forms a new, bigger one more appropriate the the individual's greater girth. When crabs do this and are caught in the process of hardening the new shell, they are referred to as soft shelled crabs. This replacement of a body part is found in many critters, and in reptiles we call it shedding. Something my python does regularly but for the last several years he has done it poorly and we now ever get a fully intact skin. Likewise I have seldom found what might be called a fully intact exoskeleton of a crab, that is, until this summer when I came upon one during the June low tides that was very close to being fully intact. So I took several shots of it and while I liked at least one which I prepared for this list, it really wasn't good enough as it was, so I decided to run it through a filter to see if I could improve on it. What resulted is in my opinion much more interesting than the original, albeit very abstract. See if you agree; the head is facing towards the left, and all the legs are visible although you may have to study it a while to locate them. ISO 200; 1/160 sec @ f / 9.

goldengardenstide08824softshelledcrabsansstylized