Daily Image - Oct 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
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11 Oct 11.  Coming home from Barber School on the night of 12 October 1962 I barely averted being crushed by a falling mature oak that missed my vehicle by less than 5 feet. It was a "memorable" moment in my life, but not as memorable as it was for many, some of whom lost their lives in the Columbus Day Storm of 1962. A major storm it was, and I was reminded of same Monday as we celebrated Columbus Day with another storm, this time with winds gusting below 50 mph. But it did move some trees around nicely and blew the clouds and rain about such that it brought back memories. Not much blew down as far as I could tell, save for a lot of leaves. Some rather brightly colored, and others not quite so. But the redistribution of the leaves made me decide that an image of fall leaves might just be in order, and so that is what I'm sharing today. Now not just your ordinary image of leaves, but one  that has be "slightly" reworked. A few months back - March time frame to be specific - I started sharing with you some B & W images that had started out as color HDR and which I then converted. At the time, I was the only one of which I'm aware doing that, as I had come across the idea on my own while trying out new photographic interpretations; within a few months I was reading articles and seeing presentations on how to do it in several publications. Now I'm sharing my latest approach to digital imaging and once again, I've seen it being done by no one else. Lets see how long it takes for this to become popular. Starting with the desired image, in this case some leaves, I've worked the image over in digital editing software to the point where I specifically want it ( it would look like most other leaf pictures I've shared across the years). Then that image is duplicated, and that dupe layer is brought into other software to be highly manipulated ( like the manipulations you been seeing lately.) Then the manipulated layer's opacity is reduced so that the manipulation is "painted" lightly onto the underlying original image. Then the manipulated layer is blended with the underlying layer using the desired blending mode to arrive at the final composite image. This is how the image for today was created. ISO 400; 1/60sec @ f / 5.6.

11 Oct 11. Coming home from Barber School on the night of 12 October 1962 I barely averted being crushed by a falling mature oak that missed my vehicle by less than 5 feet. It was a "memorable" moment in my life, but not as memorable as it was for many, some of whom lost their lives in the Columbus Day Storm of 1962. A major storm it was, and I was reminded of same Monday as we celebrated Columbus Day with another storm, this time with winds gusting below 50 mph. But it did move some trees around nicely and blew the clouds and rain about such that it brought back memories. Not much blew down as far as I could tell, save for a lot of leaves. Some rather brightly colored, and others not quite so. But the redistribution of the leaves made me decide that an image of fall leaves might just be in order, and so that is what I'm sharing today. Now not just your ordinary image of leaves, but one that has be "slightly" reworked. A few months back - March time frame to be specific - I started sharing with you some B & W images that had started out as color HDR and which I then converted. At the time, I was the only one of which I'm aware doing that, as I had come across the idea on my own while trying out new photographic interpretations; within a few months I was reading articles and seeing presentations on how to do it in several publications. Now I'm sharing my latest approach to digital imaging and once again, I've seen it being done by no one else. Lets see how long it takes for this to become popular. Starting with the desired image, in this case some leaves, I've worked the image over in digital editing software to the point where I specifically want it ( it would look like most other leaf pictures I've shared across the years). Then that image is duplicated, and that dupe layer is brought into other software to be highly manipulated ( like the manipulations you been seeing lately.) Then the manipulated layer's opacity is reduced so that the manipulation is "painted" lightly onto the underlying original image. Then the manipulated layer is blended with the underlying layer using the desired blending mode to arrive at the final composite image. This is how the image for today was created. ISO 400; 1/60sec @ f / 5.6.

autumnalcolors16418redleavesafternoonlight