Daily Image - Jun 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
15 Jun 11.  IF you were to follow the directions I gave a couple days back to the property, at the SW corner of the intersection of Eglon Road and Pilot Point Road, you will see an old farm house that has been painstakingly cared for and a large equestrian exercise area directly north of it. My grandfather and father built that house almost 100 years ago, and the exercise area was then a field of alfalfa, or clover hay, most of the time. Now as a kid hay really wasn't something about which I cared much, but the insects that could be found amongst it were of interest. One of my favorite pastimes while staying there was to see how many bees I could collect in a single jar WITHOUT either getting stung or having any of those captured escape. I don't recall having ever kept count of the number captured, and I never kept them so long as to have them die in the jars, but it was a real delight to be able to see them up very close and safely too. To this day I still have a love of bees, and never tire of trying to capture one. Part of the "game" is to get the perfect image of one; I've not so done to date, but a few of the images have come close. Look closely at this individual and you can see her split proboscis. Yes, I could have gone with a lower ISO and likely still have had a sufficiently fast shutter speed. ISO 320; 1/1250 sec @ f /7.1.

15 Jun 11. IF you were to follow the directions I gave a couple days back to the property, at the SW corner of the intersection of Eglon Road and Pilot Point Road, you will see an old farm house that has been painstakingly cared for and a large equestrian exercise area directly north of it. My grandfather and father built that house almost 100 years ago, and the exercise area was then a field of alfalfa, or clover hay, most of the time. Now as a kid hay really wasn't something about which I cared much, but the insects that could be found amongst it were of interest. One of my favorite pastimes while staying there was to see how many bees I could collect in a single jar WITHOUT either getting stung or having any of those captured escape. I don't recall having ever kept count of the number captured, and I never kept them so long as to have them die in the jars, but it was a real delight to be able to see them up very close and safely too. To this day I still have a love of bees, and never tire of trying to capture one. Part of the "game" is to get the perfect image of one; I've not so done to date, but a few of the images have come close. Look closely at this individual and you can see her split proboscis. Yes, I could have gone with a lower ISO and likely still have had a sufficiently fast shutter speed. ISO 320; 1/1250 sec @ f /7.1.

walkwaybees08482sipnectar