Daily Image - Jun 2011 Archive - sonofjohan
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11 Jun 11.  About 2 hours before quitting time Friday afternoon I received a call from my cousin requesting help with a cow that was having a difficult delivery. A couple minutes later I hit the road and picked up a gutter salesman along the way who was just about to make it to the property to give me a quote for gutters. All I could think about as I drove to the farm was all the stories I had heard as a child from grandfather, father, and other relatives who had often had to assist an animal having a difficult labor, but something I had never witnessed. Moments later were at the farm to observe the cow of interest as far away diagonally across the farm as she could possibly position herself. So it was a good walk to get her and try to herd her up to where she needed to be. That took most of an hour as she had a different idea as to where she wanted to be than we had for her. Eventually we got her into a corral where she could safely (for her and all of us) be attended. She had apparently been in labor for some time as the placenta had ruptured, and time was running out for the calf if in fact it hadn't already done so. An exam of an unwilling adult cow is quite the challenge, and the exam suggested we were too late. To make matters worse she wasn't fully dilated, so a natural birth was not likely to be happening. All of this examination and positioning took the better part of another hour. Eventually all was ready, and to solve this problem, a calf puller was employed. Small chains were wrapped around the front legs of the calf, just above the fetlocks with the other end of the chains attached to a ratcheted puller. As the ratchet was worked, the calf was pulled side to side and once the process was begun, a lovely little heifer made her debut into the world about 5 minutes later, just before 1800 last night. Believing that the calf was likely to be still born, it was a real exciting moment to see her move as soon as she hit the ground. My first birthing of a large animal. So I present to you, at roughly 5 minutes old, Eleven Three. You can still see the attached chains and the calf puller tool next to her.  ISO 320; 1/80 sec @ f / 8.

11 Jun 11. About 2 hours before quitting time Friday afternoon I received a call from my cousin requesting help with a cow that was having a difficult delivery. A couple minutes later I hit the road and picked up a gutter salesman along the way who was just about to make it to the property to give me a quote for gutters. All I could think about as I drove to the farm was all the stories I had heard as a child from grandfather, father, and other relatives who had often had to assist an animal having a difficult labor, but something I had never witnessed. Moments later were at the farm to observe the cow of interest as far away diagonally across the farm as she could possibly position herself. So it was a good walk to get her and try to herd her up to where she needed to be. That took most of an hour as she had a different idea as to where she wanted to be than we had for her. Eventually we got her into a corral where she could safely (for her and all of us) be attended. She had apparently been in labor for some time as the placenta had ruptured, and time was running out for the calf if in fact it hadn't already done so. An exam of an unwilling adult cow is quite the challenge, and the exam suggested we were too late. To make matters worse she wasn't fully dilated, so a natural birth was not likely to be happening. All of this examination and positioning took the better part of another hour. Eventually all was ready, and to solve this problem, a calf puller was employed. Small chains were wrapped around the front legs of the calf, just above the fetlocks with the other end of the chains attached to a ratcheted puller. As the ratchet was worked, the calf was pulled side to side and once the process was begun, a lovely little heifer made her debut into the world about 5 minutes later, just before 1800 last night. Believing that the calf was likely to be still born, it was a real exciting moment to see her move as soon as she hit the ground. My first birthing of a large animal. So I present to you, at roughly 5 minutes old, Eleven Three. You can still see the attached chains and the calf puller tool next to her. ISO 320; 1/80 sec @ f / 8.

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