sonofjohan
29 Aug 18	  Going with something for the first time again today. As most folks know one of the major drawbacks of a raster image (one comprised of pixels) compared to a vector image (one comprised of formulas) in that the former is lossy in scaling while the latter can be scaled up or down to the cows come home with no degradation. Of course all our digital cameras work with raster images, often called bit mapped images, and known to most folks in the form of jpg images. You can of course scale a jpg some with better results in scaling down than when scaling up, but you can get away with it to some degree with many photo editing programs out there. Last week Topaz Labs released a new program called A.I. Gigapixel which uses artificial intelligence, hence the A. I. in the name, to compute the scaled image. Not surprising to some of you I was part of the beta testers for the new program. I've been playing with it for a few weeks and thought I'd share a photo I created using the new program. I started with a RAW image from the D500 which was 4303 x 2864. I then made a crop of that original reducing the size to 2116 x 1593. This step wasn't a downsizing but just a crop off all 4 sides. Then I ran that crop file through Gigapixel creating an image 8464 x 6372 pixels. Amazingly the enlarged image is better than the original RAW capture. So the base image for today is that up-scaled shot originally taken about 10 days ago. While driving a friend around the area Jan noticed a large bird just sitting on a grassy area of a local property. We stopped to shoot it while the home owner of that same property was walking up close to the bird taking its portrait and asking me what kind of bird it was. The property owner practically had to kick it to get it to fly which it eventually did but just briefly before returning to the same spot. There was something of great interest to the bird at that location but try as we might we couldn't figure out what. I'm no expert on raptors but I do believe this to be a juvenile Osprey (fish hawk.)<br />
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All the info about the image is in the body of the text.  Defending Territory   Nikon D500; 18 - 200; Aperture priority; ISO 320; 1/500 sec @ f / 9.