sonofjohan
13 May 19	Back at it again with much having transpired while I was away. I had hoped to be able to move to a better ISP in the near future for vastly improved internet service and while pooch sitting our local community public utility held a meeting to announce the availability of a new fiber optic service for our "community." If you live exactly one mile west of where we reside it will cost just over $2K to have the service available on your street; on the road connecting us to that other road only $5K; and on our street just $8K for the privilege of hooking up. Of course connecting to that line from the house to the street is another cost. The cost of a 25 mile spool of fiber optic is currently around $10K; there are 30 houses on our &lt; 1 mile street. 30 x $8K = $240K. Seems like the "public utility" must have rather high hourly labor rates. May have to pursue this on another level as public utility rates are supposed to be the same for all. In the meantime I guess we'll have to just deal with my poor service!<br />
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The trip to Yellowstone was just under 3K miles total and the going to and returning from providing two entirely different views. On the way out NOTHING was in color, even the tamaracks were brown; on the return leg the flowering trees were doing just that, the wild flowers were abundant, and the tamaracks had turned green. An amazing contrast over just a 9 day period. Also of note were the rivers. On the way to the condo they were slow and low; on the return they were beginning to boil and much fuller. Apparently the spring thaw hadn't yet fully begun on the way out. It was the same for the rivers in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem. Interesting to see the change the occurred over just a few days.<br />
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The first week of May would appear to be the time to see the bison drop their young as there were no red dogs when I arrived but with in a day of my arrival they were appearing at the rate of 6 - 8 a day; by the time I left they were everywhere. But bison were just about the only animals I saw on this trip. Of course everyone else saw sows with their cubs but I kept my record pristine and saw none. What I did get to see on a twice daily basis was one or more of our resident red foxes. It appears that a neighbor had been feeding them eggs and they were getting very accustomed to hanging around the doors of the local homes. That got stopped forcing them to forage for themselves and as such I got to watch them hunting morning and evening. For today's submission I'm sharing one of the foxes after a successful morning hunt. I didn't know it at the time I took the photo that my prime lens had stop working properly and was no longer focusing at infinity, just close up. Fortunately the fox wasn't far away so the capture was sharp. It would take me three days of lost images to finally determine the problem so there won't be many images to share from this trip.<br />
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Other than some sever cropping and a small bit of dodging and burning, this is what the camera saw. The Hunter  Nikon D500; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 200; 1/250 sec @ f /10.
10 May 19   Back from pooch sitting and Yellowstone. We'll start the Yellowstone shots on Monday. For today a true macro. While taking Her Majesty for her morning ablutions the morning before leaving for Yellowstone our next door neighbor stopped us to chat about a group of trillium she had found on her property and invited me to come over and grab a snap of them. I went over and couldn't find them on my own but with the help of her and her husband I was led to a small part of the forested front of the property where there was a group of half a dozen plants. Some were already turning purple with the remaining still pure white. We have three plants at one location on our entryway drive, but they are much smaller than the plant she showed me. Of course I took a few shots of both the white and the purple ones. At the time of shooting I had no idea that one shot had captured more than just the flowers. It wasn't until I was making a selection on the large screen tonight that I realized that one frame had a visitor, most likely a mosquito, but I can't be certain from the perspective. Perhaps one of you can make a definite identification. For perspective, the flower of the trillium is roughly the size of a silver dollar.<br />
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Aside from some severe cropping, this is straight from the camera. In the Woods  Nikon D500; 18 - 200; Aperture Priority; ISO 320; 1/60 sec @ f / 9 with full flash.